Perceptions / Myths

Myth

Do not invest in historic property because the Architectural Review Board (ARB) is too strict and wants owners to spend lots of money. A property owner also has to be on Cable 10 to get any kind of approvals.

Fact

It's true that property owners in historic districts need to ask staff before making common exterior repairs or replacements on a building. However, over 90% are approved by staff (usually under 24 hours) and over 90% that do go before the Architectural Review Board (ARB) are approved. While ARB members are sensitive to preserving the historic integrity and character of the neighborhood, they are equally sensitive to property rights and approving alterations that ensure the vitality of historic buildings.

Did you know that any type of zoning or building permit in our historic districts cost only $10?

Myth

Development / subdivision plans take months to review and still require public hearings.

Fact

Development plans and subdivisions are administratively approved by staff with the following exceptions:

Planning Commission only hears projects that 

  1. Do not meet regulations
  2. Are zoned Planned Commercial (PC), Planned Mixed Use (PM), or Planned Residential (PR)
  3. Exceed 40,000 square feet or 100 new lots / units
  4. Are contested items such as public safety or traffic. Plans are reviewed within seven days of submittal and are electronically transmitted to other agencies to reduce the review times. There are no required dates or timeframes to submit applications.

Myth

Staff is out of the office and not available for inspections.

Fact

Regular Inspections are available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. by calling 502-352-2094. Inspections can be scheduled before 8 a.m. and after 4:30 p.m. For emergency inspections or if you need further assistance - call 502-545-0720. Did you know that any type of application, permit, or inspection can be paid online?

Myth

Frankfort uses a building code that is different than other agencies.

Fact

Building codes used by the city are the State's adopted building and residential codes that are updated by the State, as recently as 2014. While other agencies may interpret sections differently, our staff has made efforts to use one interpretation so all projects have the same expectations.

Myth

Signage is based on zoning and all sign requests must have a public hearing.

Fact

Sign regulations were changed in 2007 and are no longer based on zoning. Signage can be approved administratively for applications that meet the requirements, with very few exceptions. Temporary signs (yard signs) remain prohibited in the public right-of-way and are subject to removal without notice and will not be returned. Did you know that any sign face replacement on a pole or building (without changing the frame) does not require a permit?